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How TeX Calculates Glue Settings in an \hbox
By Graham Douglas

This is the third, and concluding, article in a series which takes a look at TeX boxes and glue. The first post Boxes and Glue: A Brief, but Visual, Introduction Using LuaTeX introduced the concepts of boxes and glue and was followed by Pandora’s \hbox: Using LuaTeX to Lift the Lid of TeX Boxes which presented a LuaTeX-based Overleaf project to explore the deeper structures of TeX boxes through the use node graphs. In this final piece we take a “deep dive” into the mechanics of how TeX calculates glue values in an \hbox: a process referred to as setting the glue. We make extensive use of node graphs (introduced in the second article in this series) and show how to use and interpret some of the data they provide: glue_set, glue_sign and glue_order.

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Pandora’s \hbox: Using LuaTeX to Lift the Lid of TeX Boxes
By Graham Douglas

Boxes and glue are two key concepts which provide the foundation for TeX’s typesetting model and capabilities. Building on the introductory material in a previous post, Boxes and Glue: A Brief, but Visual, Introduction Using LuaTeX, this extensively-illustrated article examines boxes and glue in more detail. We also present a new LuaTeX-based Overleaf project that enables you to explore the deep inner structure of TeX boxes—providing insights which will help you to truly understand their behaviour.

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Boxes and Glue: A Brief, but Visual, Introduction Using LuaTeX
By Graham Douglas

This post is a brief introduction to some key concepts/models involved in typesetting with TeX: boxes and glue—“setting the scene” for future articles that will go into much more detail.

A zoomed image section of a typeset paragraph
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Using LuaTeX to run tools and utilities installed on Overleaf’s servers
By Graham Douglas

In this short post we show how to use LuaTeX to run software tools and utilities installed on Overleaf’s servers, including how to capture, and then typeset, text that would normally be displayed in a terminal window. You might want to capture text such as success or failure reports from the program you are running, or the result of issuing command-line options such as --help to see the program’s options, or -v to determine which version of the program is installed.

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Overleaf for Book Production
By Graham Douglas

Overleaf provides a wealth of features and functionality to assist with book production. In this post we review some case studies and take a brief glimpse “under the hood” of Overleaf to see why it is a safe and secure platform on which to build innovative solutions for book publishing.

A multi-author project being managed on Overleaf
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