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Posts tagged features

Markdown into LaTeX with Style
By Lian Tze Lim

Who says LaTeX can’t be fun! Building on work published in an earlier blog article, this post shows how to use LaTeX and markdown to produce your own mini-booklets—perhaps a weekly planner or a story book for children. In this post we’ll demonstrate the possibilities by creating some recipe booklets.

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What's in a Name: A Guide to the Many Flavours of TeX
By Graham Douglas

Perhaps you’ve heard of, or read about, something called “TeX”, “LaTeX” or “pdfLaTeX”—or any one of the multitude of similar-sounding terms—but you aren’t quite sure what they actually mean? If so, then this article is for you: a non-technical background to explain the many variations of TeX-based software: LaTeX, pdfTeX, pdfLaTeX, XeTeX, XeLaTeX, LuaTeX, and LuaLaTeX—what they mean and why they exist.

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Preprints are on the rise, and they're gaining in popularity on Overleaf! Here's how it works...
By Mary Anne Baynes

Did you know that you can easily upload your document to multiple preprint servers and repositories, directly from your document in Overleaf? No? Find out how below...

Submitting to pre-print servers from Overleaf

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Overleaf Product Update: Read-only invites and Chapter/Part folding
By Ryan Looney

We’re always working to make Overleaf better by introducing new features and improving existing ones. Here are a couple of recent updates that we released this month:

Code-folding of chapters and parts on Overleaf

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Four years of collaboration with the LaTeX Community forums and sites
By John Hammersley

Just over four years ago we began one of our first collaborations – working with Stefan Kottwitz of the LaTeX Community forums and sites such as TeXample.net and pgfplots.net to provide a direct way for users of those sites to open up code examples directly in Overleaf (then called WriteLaTeX).

To get an idea of how it works, try clicking on the image below. It will open up in Overleaf for immediate editing online, just as if you'd clicked on the "Open in Overleaf" link on the example itself.

Polar plot of a sine function example from pgfplots.net
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